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To Our Valued Patients,

With the evolving situation of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and under the guidelines of the Health Officer of the Alameda and Contra-Costa Counties, our offices are open to provide eye and vision care.

Please keep in mind that in order to maintain social distancing protocols and to limit further transmission of the virus, we will be working with a reduced staff and seeing a fewer number of patients as compared to our “normal” schedule. Priority will be given to the most urgent medical cases. We will be implementing a number of measures (including altered check-in/check-out procedures, limiting the number of patients in the office and waiting room, face covering for all persons, temperature screening, etc) that will change your experience in the office. In addition, we will be ramping up our already strict disinfection policies and we will continue to monitor and abide by all local, state and, federal guidelines. Please bear with us through this new reality as these changes are designed to protect you and our staff.

We hope to see you soon and appreciate your trust in us to continue to meet your eye care needs. Stay safe and stay healthy!

The Turner Eye Institute Team

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New To Contact Lenses? Here Are Our Top 5 Tips!

“For an estimated 56 million North Americans, contact lenses are the preferred form of vision correction. So if you’ve just started wearing contact lenses — you’re in good company.

Advice About Contact Lenses from San Leandro Eye Doctor: Dr. Chirag R. Patel Here are 5 tips to quickly help you adjust to wearing and caring for your new lenses so you can enjoy the many benefits they offer.

Local Contact lens supplier near you in San Leandro, California

Learn How to Tell if Your Contact Lens Is Inside Out

This is a common mistake many beginners make when inserting soft contacts. Place the lens on your index fingertip and look carefully at its shape. The edge of the lens should be pointing upwards, like the rim of a teacup. If the edge is flared outward like a blooming flower, the lens is inside out.

Some contact lenses have tiny laser markings of numbers or letters. If the numbers/letters read correctly when you hold the lens on your fingertip, they are properly oriented and the lens is ready to be inserted.

Never Use a Substitute for Contact Lens Solution

Your eye doctor will recommend the appropriate contact lens solution to suit your eyes and lenses. Some people have sensitivities and not all lens solutions are the same.

Even if you run out of contact lens solution, don’t be tempted to rinse your lenses with water, and never use saliva to moisten or clean them.

Using substances other than the recommended contact lens solution to rinse or rewet your contacts can introduce harmful microbes to the eye and cause a serious infection. That’s why it’s best to remove your contacts before showering, swimming, or any other time they might get wet.

Turner Eye Institute Eye Clinic and Contact Lenses, Eye Care and Eye Doctors in San Leandro, California

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our San Leandro eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

If Your Contact Lenses Feel Uncomfortable, Take Them Out!

Some newcomers mistakenly think that if their contacts feel uncomfortable or gritty, they simply need to “get used to them.” Contact lenses are supposed to be comfortable, so if you are experiencing discomfort there may be something wrong.

With clean fingers, remove your contacts and rinse them, inside and out, with the solution or rewetting drops as recommended by your eye doctor. Dust or dirt could have gotten stuck between the lens and your eye, causing irritation. Flushing the lenses with contact lens solution will help remove the irritant.

If your eyes still feel irritated, don’t place the contact lenses back in your eyes. Instead, wait until they are no longer red or irritated, and try inserting them again. If the problem persists, contact your eye doctor.

Wear Contact Lens-Friendly Makeup

Wearing makeup around the eyes can be a source of irritation and infection whether you wear contact lenses or not. Here’s what we recommend when it comes to eye makeup and contact lenses:

  • Choose hypoallergenic makeup.
  • If using a cream-based product around your eyes, choose a water-based formula instead of an oil-based one.
  • Keep your eye closed during application to avoid makeup particles entering your eye.
  • Don’t apply eyeliner or eyeshadow to the inner rims of your eyelids.
  • Replace eye makeup at least once every 3 months to minimize the growth and spread of bacteria.
  • Never share eye makeup with friends or family.
  • Remove your contact lenses before removing your makeup.

Local Contact Lenses, Eye Care and Eye Doctors in San Leandro, California

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Stick to the Hygiene Guidelines

We can’t emphasize this enough — always thoroughly wash and dry your hands before handling your contact lenses.

Try to avoid washing your hands with oily or heavily scented hand soaps, as they tend to cling to the surface of the lens and could irritate the eye. Additionally, if you touch moisturizers or lotions before handling your contact lenses you run the risk of some residual product adhering to the lens and clouding your vision.

After washing your hands, dry them using a lint-free towel. It’s harder to grasp contact lenses with wet hands, and — as mentioned above — lenses shouldn’t come into contact with tap water.

Bonus Tip: Get an Eye Exam

While all this advice can be very helpful, it doesn’t replace an in-person exam with your eye doctor. Your eye doctor will advise you when to return for your next contact lens consultation. Following this schedule is the best way to ensure you can enjoy the freedom of contact lens wear.

If you are new to contact lenses (or not!) and have any questions or concerns about your eyes or vision, call 800-339-2733. Turner Eye Institute will be happy to schedule you for a contact lens exam and fitting.

With the help of Dr. Chirag R. Patel, you’ll be an expert in contact lens wear and care in no time!

Call Turner Eye Institute on 800-339-2733 to schedule an eye exam with our San Leandro optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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How Can My Child’s Myopia Be Corrected?

At Turner Eye Institute, we help children like yours achieve clear and comfortable vision, so they can succeed at the important things in life.

Methods of Myopia Correction

Contact Lenses

Contacts can be a great choice, especially for physically active children or teens who don’t want to worry about breaking or misplacing their eyeglasses. In some cases of very high myopia, contact lenses can offer clearer vision than glasses.

Corrective contact lenses are usually placed in the eyes upon waking and removed at night before bedtime. There are several types, including: soft contacts, daily disposables, extended wear, and rigid gas permeable (hard) lenses. Navigating through the differences between them can be daunting. Fortunately, if you’re located in San Leandro our eye doctor will be happy to guide you. Speak with Dr. Chirag R. Patel to determine whether your child is ready for contact lenses.

Prescription Glasses

Glasses are a popular choice among our younger patients. Choosing from an array of styles makes the process fun and exciting! Allowing the children to be active participants in selecting their eyewear increases the likelihood that they’ll actually wear them. There are strong, flexible and resilient frames which look great and are comfortable too.

The optician can customize the lenses with additions and upgrades like impact-resistant or shatter-proof materials, scratch-resistant and anti-reflective coatings, UV filters, and transition lenses that darken in the sun. For those requiring vision correction for distance and near, we also offer bifocal or multifocal lens prescriptions.

Turner Eye Institute Eye Clinic and Myopia, Nearsightedness and Children in San Leandro, California

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our San Leandro eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

We Can Help Correct Your Child’s Myopia

If you’re located near San Leandro, California, an eye exam with our optometrist can determine your child’s exact prescription, and give you the opportunity to receive answers to any questions you may have about your child’s eye health and vision. Progressive myopia, where a growing child’s prescription continues to worsen, is why it’s important for myopic children to undergo eye exams at least once a year.

Local Myopia, Nearsightedness, and Children in San Leandro, California

Read what our patients have to say on Google Reviews

At Turner Eye Institute, our friendly and knowledgeable staff will be happy to recommend the most suitable method of correcting your child’s myopia to meet his or her individual needs. Thanks to the wide range options available, your child will walk away with eyewear that will not only enhance his or her style but will also be a boost of confidence.

Let us help your child see the world in a whole new light. To schedule your child’s annual eye exam or if you have any further questions, contact Turner Eye Institute at 800-339-2733 today.

Call Turner Eye Institute on 800-339-2733 to schedule an eye exam with our San Leandro optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Four Great Tips to Relax Your Eyes

Do your eyes hurt after spending a significant amount of time reading, playing video games, driving, or staring at a screen? These visually intense activities can sometimes be hard on the eyes, causing uncomfortable symptoms like headaches and blurry vision. Other symptoms of eye strain can include light sensitivity, neck and shoulder pain, trouble concentrating, and burning or itchy eyes.

Fortunately, preventing painful computer vision syndrome and eye fatigue symptoms can be as simple as trying a few of these eye exercises. To learn more about digital eye strain and discover the best relief options for you, call Turner Eye Institute at 800-339-2733 and schedule an eye exam with Dr. Chirag R. Patel.

Relax Your Eyes with These Supportive Techniques

Many of these exercises are designed for computer users. Eye strain resulting from long drives, reading, or other activities, can be alleviated by modifying some of these recommendations.

The Clock Exercise

The clock exercise relieves strain on overworked eye muscles and can help you avoid headaches and eye pain, among other symptoms. Begin the exercise by imagining a large analog clock a few feet in front of you. Keep your head still and move your eyes to the imaginary 9, then to the imaginary 3.

Keep moving your eyes to the opposite pairs on the clock — 10/4, 11/5, 12/6, and so on. Hold your gaze for a second or two on each number before moving on to the next one. Continue doing this for 4-5 minutes.

Turner Eye Institute Eye Clinic and Eye Strain, Computer Vision and Eye Exercises in San Leandro, California

The 20-20-20 Rule

The 20-20-20 rule helps you avoid dry eyes and eye strain by giving your eyes frequent breaks. After about 20 minutes of screen time or doing close-up work, focus on an object at least 20 feet away for 20 seconds. This gives the eyes a much needed rest and helps them relax. There are also free apps available that provide pop-up reminders that notify you when it’s time to shift your gaze.

Screen Ergonomics

The American Optometric Association recommends placing computer monitors 20 to 28 inches, or 50-70 cm, away from your eyes and the top of the computer should be at eye level or right below for optimum eye comfort. Glare filters can reduce the amount of glare produced by digital devices and improve your viewing experience.

Poor sitting posture can also contribute to eye strain. Your chair should be situated so that your feet are flat on the floor, or use an angled footrest for additional comfort.

Local Eye Strain, Computer Vision and Eye Exercises in San Leandro, California

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Optimize your Eyewear

Since regular prescription lenses or glasses may not adequately meet your visual needs for lengthy computer use, you may benefit from wearing computer glasses. These prescription glasses are customized to your needs and also reduce glare and block blue light.

You don’t have to live with the discomforts of eye strain. If symptoms persist, it may be time to visit Turner Eye Institute and get the relief you seek. Call our office to schedule a convenient eye doctor’s appointment.

Call Turner Eye Institute on 800-339-2733 to schedule an eye exam with our San Leandro optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US


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How To Prevent “Mask Fog” on Your Glasses

If you wear glasses and a face mask, you’ve probably struggled with “mask fog.” Your lenses get all misty, requiring you to wipe your eyewear throughout the day. Below are a few strategies to help you prevent your eyeglasses from fogging up when wearing a mask.

But First, Why Do Glasses Fog Up?

Quite simply, condensation forms whenever moist warm air hits a cool surface. Your specs fog up when the mask directs your warm breath upward instead of in front of you — which is great for preventing virus transmission but bad for anyone with less-than-stellar eyesight.

Is Your Mask Well Fitted?

The mask should fit securely over your nose. Ideally, you’ll want to wear a mask with a nose bridge or one that can be shaped or molded to your face. When the mask fits properly, hopefully most of your breath will go through it, not out the top or sides.

Turner Eye Institute Eye Clinic and Mask Fog, Optometry, Eye Health in San Leandro, California

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our San Leandro eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

Use Your Glasses To Seal the Top of Your Mask

This method works best with large, thick eyewear frames. By pulling your mask up higher on your nose and placing the lower part of your eyeglasses on the mask, you can get a snug fit that blocks your warm breath from escaping upward toward your eyewear.

Tape Your Mask to Your Face

You can always use tape to secure your mask across the bridge of your nose and the top of your cheeks. Use easy-to-remove tape, including adhesive, medical, or athletic. Just be sure to stay away from duct tape.

Local Mask Fog, Optometry, Eye Health in San Leandro, California

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Soap and Water Help Prevent Fogging

This trick is one that healthcare professionals regularly turn to. All you need for this hack is soapy water (dish soap works best) and a microfiber cloth. Stay away from soaps with lotions in them as they can leave a thick residue, making it even harder to see.

Simply rub both sides of your lenses with a drop of soap, then buff the lenses with a soft microfiber cloth. This effective trick helps prevent your lenses from fogging up as a transparent, thin film of soap acts as a barrier.

Anti-Fog Wipes and Sprays

Another option is to purchase wipes and sprays designed to tackle foggy lenses. Read the fine print, as certain anti-fog solutions may not work as well, or may even damage lenses with coatings that minimize glare and fingerprint smudges, for example.

To learn more about ways to keep your glasses from fogging while wearing a mask, contact Turner Eye Institute in San Leandro today.

Call Turner Eye Institute on 800-339-2733 to schedule an eye exam with our San Leandro optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US


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Should You Get Lens Replacement Surgery?

Learn the facts about this revolutionary refractive surgery

Most of the time, when people talk about vision correction surgery they’re either discussing LASIK or lens replacement surgery. While articles about LASIK are plentiful, information about lens replacement surgery may be less discussed – however, it’s one of the safest and most regularly performed surgeries in the world. What is this procedure? Our eye doctors in San Leandro, Concord, and Castro Valley, California, explain all you need to know.

What is lens replacement surgery?

This procedure can be done in a few different ways, all of which are intended to safely diminish your dependency on prescription eyeglasses or contact lenses. Lens replacement surgery can correct nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), and presbyopia (the age-related vision condition of having trouble seeing up-close).

The three primary methods of lens replacement surgery are:

  1. Refractive Lens Exchange – also called refractive lens replacement, this treatment can correct all types of refractive error. It involves surgically removing and replacing the eye’s natural lens with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). It is particularly appropriate for patients with a thin cornea, and it’s also a common alternative for patients who are older than 40 years who do not make good candidates for LASIK.
  2. Implantable Contact Lenses (ICLs) – ICL surgery is done by implanting contact lenses in the eye. Advanced phakic IOLs are implanted behind the iris and over the eye’s natural lens. It is a reversible procedure.
  3. Cataract Surgery – this procedure is almost the same as refractive lens surgery. If you have cataracts, the eye surgeon will remove the cloudy lens affected by the cataract and replace it with an IOL, leading to a dramatic improvement in vision and also reducing the need for prescription eyewear.

What are the pros and cons of lens replacement surgery?

Depending on your personal vision condition, we may recommend lens replacement surgery at our eye care clinics in San Leandro, Concord, and Castro Valley, California, as the best form of surgical vision correction.

But it’s important to us that you understand this procedure, including the advantages and risks.

Pros

  • Effective treatment for astigmatism, dry eye syndrome, cataracts, nearsightedness, farsightedness, and presbyopia
  • High safety level; very low complication rate
  • Best known treatment for extreme cases of farsightedness
  • Lowers your need for prescription eyewear
  • Suitable for patients over 50 years old
  • Reduces your chances of developing eye infections later in life
  • Gives an added bonus of preventing you from ever needing cataract surgery
  • Recovery is fast, and most patients experience optimal results after only a few days

Cons

  • If you suffer from nearsightedness, lens replacement surgery can raise your risk of retinal detachment during the procedure.
  • The surgery can be costlier than other refractive surgeries, such as LASIK.

Lens replacement surgery has proven results – Learn more!

For answers to your questions about this refractive surgery, as well as other laser eye surgeries, such as LASIK, book a consultation with our eye doctor in San Leandro, Concord, or Castro Valley, California.

At Turner Eye Institute, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 800-339-2733 or book an appointment online to see one of our San Leandro eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

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Why You Should Avoid Online Eye Tests

An online eye exam is an automated and interactive vision test that claims to measure mainly visual acuity. It may seem like a convenient way to evaluate your vision or get an eyeglass or contact lens prescription, as these tests can be administered using your computer, tablet, or smartphone from the comfort of your home.

But these tests — which should not be confused with telehealth visits — are performed by a computer program, not a professional eye care practitioner, and they cannot and should not replace a comprehensive, in-person eye exam.

Online eye tests, which are impersonal and superficial by nature, can cause you to miss out on some important, even life-saving, information about your eye health and vision.

What Do Online Eye Tests Evaluate?

First off, it’s important to recognize that an online eye test does not evaluate the health of your eyes. It’s more of a vision test than an eye test, as it’s designed as an attempt to measure your visual acuity and refractive error, and, in some cases, contrast sensitivity and color blindness. Furthermore, the accuracy of the prescriptions provided by online vision tests is questionable. Providing the correct optical prescription requires the eye doctor’s direct and open communication with the patient. The right prescription needs subjective input and experienced analysis from an eye doctor — professional skills that can never be replicated accurately through an online program.

While the technology promises convenience, the American Optometric Association (AOA) advises caution, as these exams can offer misleading information and may contribute to a patient believing—incorrectly—that his or her eye health needs have been met. The online eye test measurements provide little-to-no information on the health of your eyes, and cannot determine whether you may have a sight-threatening condition such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, or other eye diseases. Nor do online exams address problems like dry eye, retinal detachment, diabetic retinopathy, or functional vision problems — such as difficulty with eye teaming or convergence insufficiency.

The Importance of a Comprehensive Eye Exam

Optometrists undergo years of study and specialized training. They develop a comprehensive understanding of how to evaluate your eyes not only for sight, but for any underlying conditions. In fact, vision and health are closely linked. Comprehensive eye exams enable Dr. Chirag R. Patel to detect signs of diseases that may affect your entire body, but which show early signs in your eyes.

These include:

  • Hypertension
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Strokes
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) or a brain tumor

Is a Virtual Eye Exam Cost-Saving?

Some people erroneously believe that an online eye test can save them not only time but also money, compared with a comprehensive eye exam performed by an optometrist or ophthalmologist. It’s important to note that these virtual tests offer only a sliver of the services you’d normally receive from your eye doctor during a thorough ocular exam.

Carrying out a professional eye exam requires training, precision, and the proper equipment. Anything less can put your eyes and vision at serious risk.

Safeguard Your Eyes and Sight

A comprehensive in-person eye exam is the only way to determine whether your eyes are healthy and free from sight-threatening conditions. Early detection and treatment of these problems can potentially prevent vision loss. Eye care practitioners frequently discover an infection, chronic illness or eye disease during what patients would have expected to be a simple, routine ocular exam. These scenarios are far more common than we’d like to imagine.

To safeguard the health of your eyes and sight, have a comprehensive, in-person eye exam with Dr. Chirag R. Patel on a regular basis. Your health may depend on it.

Turner Eye Institute in San Leandro provides comprehensive eye exams using the most advanced equipment available. Schedule an exam with us today.

 

Did You Know That 20% of People Sleep With Their Eyes Open?

jen theodore pSGmANK36LQ unsplashEver heard the saying “to sleep with one eye open”? It’s generally used as a metaphor when advising one to stay vigilant. But sleeping with eyes open is a common eye and sleep disorder known as nocturnal lagophthalmos. In fact, the National Sleep Foundation estimates that about 1 in 5 people sleep with their eyes open.

This condition is problematic because it can interfere with sleep and impact eye health. People may not get as much sleep, or sleep as soundly as they’d like, due to the pain and discomfort caused by the eyes drying out during the night.

Nocturnal lagophthalmos generally indicates an underlying medical condition, such as a thyroid problem or an autoimmune disorder. If upon waking you experience irritated, dry, tired, red, or painful eyes, or if you suspect you might be sleeping with your eyes open, speak with Dr. Chirag R. Patel at Turner Eye Institute today.

What Happens When You Sleep With Your Eyes Open?

People who have nocturnal lagophthalmos may not even know they have it. It is difficult to evaluate whether your eyes are closed when you’re actually asleep. However, some important indicators may point to the condition, including:

  • Eyes that feel scratchy, irritated and dry
  • Blurred vision
  • Red eyes
  • Eye pain
  • Tired eyes

For those with nocturnal lagophthalmos, the eye loses the protection of a closed lid and becomes dehydrated, causing the tear layer to evaporate and the eyes to become dry. Nocturnal lagophthalmos also reduces the eye’s ability to discharge contaminants such as dust and debris that fall into the eye during the night. These contaminants can potentially lead to:

  • Eye infections
  • Corneal damage, such as corneal abrasion, sores and ulcers
  • Eye dryness and irritation
  • Poor quality sleep
  • Loss of vision

Why Do We Close Our Eyes to Sleep?

There are several reasons why it’s important to close our eyes while we sleep. Closed eyelids block light, which stimulates the brain to wakefulness.

Closing our eyes also protects and lubricates the eyes while we sleep. If your eyelids don’t close, your eyes become more susceptible to dryness, infections, and debris that can scratch and damage the cornea.

Why do Certain People Sleep With Their Eyes Open?

There are a number of reasons people might sleep with their eyes open. The most common reasons for nocturnal lagophthalmos include:

Problems With Facial Nerves and Muscles

Issues with facial nerves and muscles surrounding the eyelid can cause the lid to remain open during sleep. Weakness in facial nerves can be attributed to several factors.

 

  • Injury or trauma
  • Stroke
  • Tumor
  • Bell’s palsy, a condition that causes temporary paralysis or weakness of facial

muscles.

  • Autoimmune disorders and infections, such as Lyme disease, chickenpox, Guillain-Barre syndrome, mumps, and several others.
  • Moebius syndrome, a rare condition that causes problems with cranial nerves.

Damaged Eyelids

Eyelids can become damaged as a result of surgery, injury or illness, making it difficult to fully close the eyes during sleep. Furthermore, a condition known as floppy eyelid syndrome can also interfere with eye closure, and is often associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is commonly linked to eye diseases like glaucoma and optic neuropathy.

Thyroid-Related Eye Problems

A common symptom of Grave’s disease, a form of hypothyroidism, is protruding eyes. The bulging eyes, known as Graves’ ophthalmopathy, can prevent the eyes from closing.

Genetics

There also tends to be a genetic component to nocturnal lagophthalmos, as it often runs in families. Whatever the cause, the symptoms of nocturnal lagophthalmos are uncomfortable and the consequences can lead to ocular complications.

Can Nocturnal Lagophthalmos Be Treated?

This condition can be treated in several ways, depending on the underlying cause and severity of symptoms. Treatments include:

  • Administering artificial tears throughout the day, providing a film of moisture around the eyes that protects them at night.
  • Wearing an eye mask or goggles to protect the eyes from external debris and visual stimulation. These items are uniquely designed to generate moisture for the eyes while you sleep.
  • Using a humidifier, which provides a moisture-rich environment to prevent your eyes from drying out.
  • Wearing eyelid weights to help keep the eyelids closed.
  • In acute cases, surgery may be recommended.

Make sure to consult your eye doctor before undertaking any of these treatments.

Because nocturnal lagophthalmos sometimes signals an underlying condition, it is especially important to contact Dr. Chirag R. Patel at Turner Eye Institute in San Leandro for a proper diagnosis and to receive prompt treatment. If nocturnal lagophthalmos is left untreated for an extended period, patients risk seriously damaging their eyes and vision.

When Routine Eye Exams Return 

woman wearing a mask 640When stay-at-home restrictions begin to lift in many areas, optometry practices will open their doors for routine care, and eye exams for glasses, contact lenses, and eye surgery will be offered once again.

Practices are implementing strict precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and to ensure everyone’s safety. Below are a few of the changes you should expect when you come in for your eye exam.

Expect the Following Changes at Turner Eye Institute

Turner Eye Institute in San Leandro has strict protocols in place to prevent the spread of coronavirus and other infections. You should expect the following during your next appointment:

  • Your optometrist will wear a face mask, gloves, and eye shield or face-covering safety shield, while patients will be required to wear a face mask.
  • You will need to wash or disinfect your hands upon entering the practice, as well as when you enter different rooms.
  • Packed waiting rooms will be a thing of the past. We will be spacing out seating to reduce capacity, and scheduling appointments to limit patient interaction.
  • If you aren’t feeling well or have been in contact with someone who is ill, we ask you to let us know prior to your visit, and we will postpone your appointment by two to three weeks.
  • We will space out appointments in a way that will allow our staff to sterilize office fixtures and equipment before and after each patient’s visit. Exam rooms will be completely disinfected between appointments.
  • We will frequently wipe down counters, chairs, equipment, and doorknobs. In the dispensary, eyeglass frames will be promptly disinfected after use.
  • We will utilize a large shield during the slit lamp part of the exam, which requires the nearest doctor-to-patient contact. The protective shield will prevent respiratory droplets from being spread. (The slit lamp shines light into the patient’s eye, enabling Dr. Chirag R. Patel to examine the internal health of your eye.)

The only constant in life is change. COVID-19 has led to rapid changes across most industries, and optometry is no exception. We continue to adapt to this new reality, to ensure that our patients receive the care they need, in comfort and safety. .

Is your vision blurred? Are you seeing spots or floaters? Are your glasses broken? Do you need contact lenses? Contact Turner Eye Institute in San Leandro today for help.

Refractive Lens Exchange – Not Just for Cataracts!

How does this vision correction surgery compare with LASIK?

If you’re interested in seeing crisp and clear without glasses or contact lenses and LASIK isn’t suitable for your eyes, refractive lens exchange (RLE) may be the right option for you. This procedure is a type of lens replacement surgery that can correct refractive error, giving you crisp and clear vision without prescription eyewear.

Refractive lens exchange is done by removing your eye’s natural lens and replacing it with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) that corrects your refractive error, giving you sharp sight. It is particularly suitable for people with extreme farsightedness or presbyopia, for whom LASIK, PRK, or phakic IOL surgery isn’t typically recommended.

After refractive lens exchange in San Leandro, Concord, and Castro Valley, California, most of our patients can see clearly with a significantly reduced reliance on prescription glasses. They are excited about the new ability to leave their bifocals or reading glasses behind!

Lens replacement surgery isn’t just for cataracts

Cataract surgery involves replacing the cloudy lens caused by cataracts with a transparent intraocular lens. While the cataract surgery procedure is the same as refractive lens exchange, the difference is that RLE is done to replace your clear lens – and not to replace the diseased lens of cataracts. Our eye surgeon at Turner Eye Institute performs lens replacement regularly (especially when LASIK or other refractive surgery isn’t appropriate) to help patients focus clearly without prescription eyewear, even if no cataracts are present.

Types of IOLs used

Intraocular lenses are not one-size-fits-all; the fit is personalized. Your eye surgeon will evaluate your visual needs and eye health to recommend the most effective IOL.

Just like when replacing cataracts, three different kinds of intraocular lenses are available as substitutes for your natural lens. These three types are:

  • Monofocal fixed-focus IOLs – for clear vision at near, distance, and intermediate ranges, but not all three types of vision at once. Monofocal IOLs also include toric lenses to treat astigmatism.
  • Multifocal IOLs – with these, you can benefit from clear vision at multiple distances.
  • Accommodating IOLs – this type of monofocal lens enables you to focus and see clearly at multiple distances, because it shifts its positioning in the eye

Lens replacement surgery to treat presbyopia

If you’re over 40 years old, you’re probably familiar with presbyopia – the vision condition that makes it hard to focus on close objects and read fine print. Typically, people wear reading glasses, bifocals or progressive lenses, monovision contacts, and multifocal contact lenses to correct presbyopia. While LASIK cannot directly address presbyopia – refractive lens exchange can do it successfully! RLE is often the most suitable surgical option for people with presbyopia, and a range of FDA-approved multifocal IOLs is now available, such as Restor by Alcon, ReZoom and Tecnis by Abbott, and the accommodating IOL Crystalens by Bausch & Lomb. These replacement lenses give you the ability to focus at all distances, including reading tiny text up close.

Facts about refractive lens exchange

  • Altogether, this lens replacement surgery takes about 15 minutes, performed on an outpatient basis in our eye clinics in San Leandro, Concord, and Castro Valley, California.
  • Each eye is operated on separately, with surgeries done about a week apart.
  • Numbing eye drops will be administered to provide a pain-free experience.
  • Typically, the recovery period is about a week, and then you’ll be able to return to your normal daily activities, including driving.
  • Most people report vision improvement almost immediately after RLE, however the final results can take up to a few weeks to see.
  • During recovery, possible side effects include blurry vision, seeing glare or halos, and a scratchy sensation in your eyes during the healing process.
  • Usually, people don’t feel the IOL in their eye, and because it’s not worn on the surface of your eye – nobody else can see it either.
  • The risk of vision deterioration or loss of vision correction is minimal over time.

Refractive lens exchange versus LASIK

If you have a severe refractive error or an irregular cornea, you may not be a good candidate for LASIK. In these cases, our eye doctor in San Leandro, Concord, and Castro Valley, California, may recommend lens replacement surgery as the preferred surgical alternative. When it comes to correcting high hyperopia (farsightedness), visual acuity after RLE is generally much sharper than the results of LASIK.

Lens replacement surgery is a more invasive procedure than LASIK, and therefore the risks are slightly higher. Yet, serious complications are rare, and most problems that may develop later can be treated successfully.

Usually, RLE is not the frontline option for people with nearsightedness (myopia), because people with myopia have an increased risk of retinal detachment during the procedure. That’s when LASIK may be a better vision solution.

Also, RLE tends to be costlier than LASIK, and it is not usually covered by vision insurance.

Is lens replacement surgery for you?

Our eye doctors are experienced and knowledgeable about this breakthrough vision correction procedure, and we’re happy to share our knowledge! We have the answers to your questions; book an appointment at one of our advanced eye care centers in San Leandro, Concord, and Castro Valley, California, for more info.

At Turner Eye Institute, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 800-339-2733 or book an appointment online to see one of our San Leandro eye doctors.

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What Will Optometry Practices Look Like Post-COVID?

COVID-19’s rapid sweep across the country has forced optical practices to make rapid clinical management decisions. Some optometrists temporarily shuttered their businesses due to the pandemic, while others began to offer emergency appointment services and telehealth.

 

As mandatory restrictions begin to lift in many locations, optometrists are beginning to open their doors for routine care. But this time around they will implement strict social distancing guidelines and take unprecedented precautions to limit the spread of infection.

Some of the Changes You Should Expect to See

 

1) Signage throughout the office spelling out new steps and protocols to ensure maximum safety for staff and patients alike.

 

2) Social distancing will be the new norm. Packed waiting rooms will be a thing of the past. Instead, clinics will be spacing out seating to reduce capacity and scheduling in longer intervals to minimize patient interactions. Some clinics may ask patients to wait in their cars until they receive a text message from the office stating that they can come in.

 

3) Certain practices will require appointments for individuals to see and try on the array of frames and sunglasses at the dispensary. Bookings will be in 15-20 minute increments, accessed by one individual at a time.

 

4) Methods will be introduced to decrease the number of surfaces a patient touches. This will include leaving the clinic’s front door open (or replacing it with a motion-activated door), facilitating cashless payments, and encouraging patients to fill out registration forms online.

 

5) Patients who aren’t feeling well or who have been in contact with someone who is ill will be asked to reschedule their appointment two to three weeks in the future.

 

6) Measuring one’s temperature at the entrance will become commonplace — this goes for both staff and patients. Though not the most reliable screening tool, as those who are asymptomatic can still spread the virus, it will identify some people who aren’t well. Anyone registering 100.4° or above will be sent home.

 

7) There will be more time between appointments, to allow the staff to thoroughly clean and disinfect before and after each patient’s visit.

 

8) Many eye practitioners will be wearing safety goggles and face masks, particularly during any up-close contact with the patient. Patients may also be asked to wear masks.

 

9) Individuals with suspected ocular infections will be put in a special containment area.

 

10) Practices will frequently wipe down any patient area, including chairs, counters and doorknobs. Every exam room will be completely disinfected between appointments. In the dispensary, frames will be promptly disinfected after patients touch them.

11) Patients will be requested to wash or disinfect their hands upon entering the office and when entering different rooms. Turner Eye Institute in San Leandro has strict hygiene and sterilization protocols in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other infections.

If you’re dealing with a vision or eye health issue and need to visit Turner Eye Institute, or if you would like some more information on how we have adapted our practice due to COVID-19, please don’t hesitate in contacting us. We’ll be happy to assist you however we can.

Turner Eye Institute serves patients from San Leandro, California.

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