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To Our Valued Patients,

With the evolving situation of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and under the guidelines of the Health Officer of the Alameda and Contra-Costa Counties, our offices are open to provide eye and vision care.

Please keep in mind that in order to maintain social distancing protocols and to limit further transmission of the virus, we will be working with a reduced staff and seeing a fewer number of patients as compared to our “normal” schedule. Priority will be given to the most urgent medical cases. We will be implementing a number of measures (including altered check-in/check-out procedures, limiting the number of patients in the office and waiting room, face covering for all persons, temperature screening, etc) that will change your experience in the office. In addition, we will be ramping up our already strict disinfection policies and we will continue to monitor and abide by all local, state and, federal guidelines. Please bear with us through this new reality as these changes are designed to protect you and our staff.

We hope to see you soon and appreciate your trust in us to continue to meet your eye care needs. Stay safe and stay healthy!

The Turner Eye Institute Team

Home » Eye Care » Your Eye Health » Eye Diseases » Diabetes and Eyesight » Causes of Diabetic Retinopathy

Causes of Diabetic Retinopathy

What are the causes of diabetic retinopathy and long-term diabetes? Changes in blood-sugar levels is the main culprit. People suffering from diabetes generally develop diabetic retinopathy after at least ten years of having the disease. Once you are diagnosed with diabetes, it is essential to have an eye exam once a year or more.

In the early stage of diabetic retinopathy, called background or non-proliferative retinopathy, high blood sugar in the retina damages blood vessels, which bleed or leak fluid. This leaking or bleeding causes swelling in the retina, which forms deposits.

In the later stage of diabetic retinopathy, called proliferative retinopathy, new blood vessels begin to grow on the retinal. These new blood vessels may break, causing bleeding into the vitreous, which is the clear gelatinous matter that fills the inside of the eye. This breakage can cause serious vision difficulties. This form of diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness, and is therefore the more serious form of the disease.

It is not hard to greatly reduce your risk of diabetic retinopathy by following some simple steps and being aware of your overall health. The most important factor you can control is maintaining your blood sugar at a healthy level. Eating a healthy diet will help greatly in controlling blood sugar levels. A regular exercise regimen is also a great help. Finally, make sure to listen to your doctor’s instructions.

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