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To Our Valued Patients,

With the evolving situation of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, effective immediately, we will be suspending all non-urgent eye care. Moreover, any non-emergent or elective surgery will also have to be postponed. We will continue to remain open for patients with urgent and emergent concerns only. It is important to us to keep these patients out of the emergency room so our healthcare heroes on the front lines can be available for the patients that need them the most.

Our staff will continue to answer calls and scheduling appointments to the best of their ability.  In addition, if appropriate, Dr Patel can be available for telemedicine visits via online video chat. If you would like to schedule a telemedicine appointment with Dr. Patel, please call our office first to determine eligibility and to obtain an appointment time. Instructions for how to connect to the telemedicine appointment will be given at that time.

We hope to see you back in our office in the not too distant future. Stay safe and stay healthy!

The Turner Eye Institute Team

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Home » Eye Care » Your Eye Health » Eye Diseases » Diabetes and Eyesight » Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy

Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy

95% of people diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy, if treated promptly, can avoid significant vision loss.

Laser photocoagulation treatment seals off blood vessels that are leaking into the eye, and stops new blood vessels from growing. This laser treatment only takes a few moments, and is painless.

Sometimes in diabetic retinopathy blood leaks into the vitreous humor in the eye, clouding vision. Some eye doctors wait before choosing treatment, as the blood may dissipate by itself. Another treatment option is a vitrectomy, which removes blood that has already leaked into the vitreous humor.

To improve the supply of blood to the core inner portion of the retina, a laser may be used to destroy tissue on the outside of the retina which is not essential for basic vision. This procedure is used to save vision.

Lucentis is a medication that is administered by an eye doctor using injections. This medication was approved by the FDA in 2015, and is the first non-laser treatment approved by the FDA. The FDA is currently reviewing several other non-laser treatments for diabetic retinopathy.

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