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To Our Valued Patients,

With the evolving situation of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, effective immediately, we will be suspending all non-urgent eye care. Moreover, any non-emergent or elective surgery will also have to be postponed. We will continue to remain open for patients with urgent and emergent concerns only. It is important to us to keep these patients out of the emergency room so our healthcare heroes on the front lines can be available for the patients that need them the most.

Our staff will continue to answer calls and scheduling appointments to the best of their ability.  In addition, if appropriate, Dr Patel can be available for telemedicine visits via online video chat. If you would like to schedule a telemedicine appointment with Dr. Patel, please call our office first to determine eligibility and to obtain an appointment time. Instructions for how to connect to the telemedicine appointment will be given at that time.

We hope to see you back in our office in the not too distant future. Stay safe and stay healthy!

The Turner Eye Institute Team

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Home » Eye Care » Your Eye Health » Eye Exams » Common Tests » Ophthalmoscope

Ophthalmoscope

While an ophthalmoscope may seem similar to the retina scope, it has a different purpose.

This is a handheld device that combines a light source with built-in mirrors and lenses so that your eye doctor can examine the interior structures of the eye. An ophthalmoscope is particularly useful for examining the structures of the retina—the light sensitive area at the back of the eye responsible for processing images.

Traditionally part of almost every eye exam, ophthalmoscopes can identify healthy structures within the eyeball, and easily help your eye doctor see symptoms or indicators of diseases of the eye.

In some instances, your eye doctor will use an indirect ophthalmoscope to gain a broader view of your eye’s internal structure, especially the retina.

With indirect ophthalmoscopes, your eye doctor wears a head visor (like a jeweler) that projects a bright light. By holding different handheld lenses in front of your eye, your doctor can better see, and magnify, the inside of your eye.

How does an ophthalmoscope it work?

Your eye doctor will dim the lights of the room and ask you to focus on a fixed point on a far wall. Using direct or indirect ophthalmoscopes, your eye doctor will examine the structures of your eye. Sometimes, special drops are used to “open up” (dilate) your pupils to aid your eye doctor in the exam.

Your eye doctor is looking for signs of a healthy retina, and also for indicators of any number of potential eye problems like cataracts or macular degeneration.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit EyeGlass Guide today!

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