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To Our Valued Patients,

With the evolving situation of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and under the guidelines of the Health Officer of the Alameda and Contra-Costa Counties, our offices are open to provide eye and vision care.

Please keep in mind that in order to maintain social distancing protocols and to limit further transmission of the virus, we will be working with a reduced staff and seeing a fewer number of patients as compared to our “normal” schedule. Priority will be given to the most urgent medical cases. We will be implementing a number of measures (including altered check-in/check-out procedures, limiting the number of patients in the office and waiting room, face covering for all persons, temperature screening, etc) that will change your experience in the office. In addition, we will be ramping up our already strict disinfection policies and we will continue to monitor and abide by all local, state and, federal guidelines. Please bear with us through this new reality as these changes are designed to protect you and our staff.

We hope to see you soon and appreciate your trust in us to continue to meet your eye care needs. Stay safe and stay healthy!

The Turner Eye Institute Team

Home » Eye Care » Your Eye Health » Eye Exams » Common Tests » Peripheral Vision Test

Peripheral Vision Test

As part of a comprehensive eye exam or vision screening, eye doctors almost always include a peripheral vision test.

Your peripheral vision is the visual field at the “outside” of your vision. That means, while your eyes may be “focused” on an object directly in front of you, you should still have the ability to see and recognize objects to your left, right, up and down—not directly in your line of sight.

Since peripheral vision loss can be a sign of a number of eye diseases, including glaucoma and other optic nerve disorders, side vision must be tested regularly.

How does a peripheral vision test work?

A peripheral vision test takes little time and is usually incorporated into the early portion of the eye exam.

The most common type of peripheral vision testing is “confrontational” peripheral vision testing, where your eye doctor asks you to focus on a target directly in front of you (the doctor’s eye, or an upraised finger, for example). With one eye covered, and your focus trained on the target, you’ll be asked to describe things you see in the “side” of your vision.

What’s important to remember is to keep focus on the main target and honestly describe what you see. You’ll then cover the other eye and repeat the procedure.

Peripheral vision loss indicates there may be an eye problem present, one that can then be tested for in greater detail during your eye examination.

There are additional types of peripheral vision testing using automated machines with a series of blinking lights in the outer visual field, or special cards with specific lines and patterns that create forced optical illusions.

No matter what the form of test, know that peripheral vision loss is a serious symptom that needs to be evaluated by a qualified eyecare professional.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

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